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COVID-19

Steps To Keep You Safe

Screening

Screening of Staff and Visitors: limited entry points ensure that all staff, patients and visitors are screened before entering any facility or home; everyone must pass both a symptom and temperature evaluation.

Coverings

Face Coverings/Masks For All: Staff wear face masks and eye protection and patients are asked to wear face coverings; masks will be provided if needed.

Distancing

Social Distancing Safeguards: This includes spaced seating, floor markings, signage and limited visitor policies.

Cleaning

Rigorous Cleaning Protocols in All Areas: Cleaning protocols meet all recommended guidelines to keep everyone safe.

COVID-19 Vaccination Phased Approach
The State of Illinois is now in COVID-19 Vaccine Phase 1b for residents age 65 and older, and frontline essential workers. NorthShore is communicating directly with our current patients 65 and older by email with steps to prepare to receive the vaccine as we get doses from the appropriate local public health agencies. If you are a current patient and at least 65 years old, please follow these steps to ensure you are prepared.

Please Note: At this time NorthShore is only preparing to vaccinate individuals 65 and older along with those in the existing 1a group (healthcare workers and residents and staff of long term care facilities.) Frontline essential workers (in Phase 1b) can receive vaccine access information by contacting their local public health agencies:

As more vaccine becomes available groups will widen and this page will be updated. For more information on the phases and the vaccination itself, you can read below, or view the IDPH Phased Vaccination Plan.

What if someone is under age 65 but has underlying health conditions. Can they be moved up to Phase 1b?

Unfortunately, no. This population will be part of the next cohort group in Phase 1c. No timeline has currently been set for vaccinations to begin for that phase.

Is there a specific vaccine deemed to be most effective for those age 65 and older?

No. There’s no substantive difference between the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines in terms of efficacy for any age group or population.

How are hospitals receiving its COVID-19 vaccine?

Hospitals receive its COVID-19 vaccine allocations through the public health infrastructure. Currently we’re only vaccinating Phase 1a participants which include healthcare workers and will be transitioning to Phase 1b for those 65 years and older. As the COVID-19 vaccine distribution evolves and we expand the vaccine eligibility phases, we will update our processes and outreach.

Are there any individual factors that might make me ineligible to receive the vaccine?

The CDC’s Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices has published its guidance on special populations, and it supports offering the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine to individuals age 16 and older, and the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to individuals age 18 and older. The only absolute contraindication is for individuals with a known anaphylactic reaction to any of the components in the vaccine, in particular to polyethylene glycol. Click here for full details on this clinical guidance.

Do we know how long the vaccine will protect me against COVID-19?

While the vaccine prevented individuals in the clinical trials from getting COVID in the 90 days after completing the vaccine series, we don’t know how long this protection will last beyond that time frame. Both Pfizer and Moderna began their clinical trials in late July, so they’ve been able to follow their volunteers for only six months. It’s conceivable that the vaccines can provide long-lasting protection, or effectiveness could fade away in under a year and require a booster shot annually. We need more data and time to understand how long the vaccine will last.

How long does it take for the vaccine to become effective?

It typically takes at least a week after the second vaccine dose or approximately one month after you start the two-vaccine series. That means it's possible you could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and get sick. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection. So it’s very important that you continue the key safety practices of facemasks, hand hygiene, and social distancing.

Can the vaccinated person still spread COVID-19 once the vaccine takes effect?

We don’t have data on whether receiving the vaccine keeps you from spreading the virus to others. This means that everyone—whether they have received the vaccine or not—will need to continue to wear facemasks, practice physical distancing and good hand hygiene.

Is the vaccine safe? What is the science data behind it?

The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines are being distributed under Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). An FDA committee granted an EUA for the Pfizer vaccine on Dec. 10, and the Moderna vaccine will be reviewed a week later. Our recommendations assume that both EUAs will be granted. In order for an EUA to be granted, the data submitted is rigorously reviewed by teams of FDA scientists. But this data is yet to be published in the peer-reviewed literature.

Both are forms of a new type of vaccine that involves injecting mRNA, which replicates the spike protein on the COVID-19 virus. Once you’re injected with the vaccine, your body begins to manufacture the same spike protein to create antibodies to fight it. If you’ve taken the vaccine and are later exposed to COVID-19, the antibodies created inside your body will keep the virus from entering the cells and causing an infection.

No. The two vaccines with EUA contain the virus mRNA (which is like a recipe) for the spike protein on the virus.

No. While the vaccine doesn’t contain either live or dead virus, you may develop “flu-like” symptoms such as tiredness, fevers or headaches after receiving one or both doses of the vaccine but these usually resolve within three days.

The State of Illinois is now in Phase 1b which includes residents age 65 and over, and frontline essential workers. We do not know when Phase 1c will begin. For more information on the phases and the vaccination itself read the IDPH Phased Vaccination Plan

Each state is making its own decisions on adhering to the CDC recommendations, resulting in various groups being prioritized to receive the vaccine. We are following the IDPH recommendations.

Our colleagues within public health are best equipped to answer your questions. Below, please find contact information for the health department in your area.

Yes, you will need to take both doses of the vaccine from the same manufacturer administered either 21 or 28 days apart. This double dose allows your body to develop a stronger immune response to counter a future infection. Your body also needs the extra exposure time to learn how to most effectively fight off exposure to the virus.

Yes, you will need to take both doses of the vaccine from the same manufacturer administered either 21 or 28 days apart. This double dose allows your body to develop a stronger immune response to counter a future infection. Your body also needs the extra exposure time to learn how to most effectively fight off exposure to the virus.

Yes, you will need to take both doses of the vaccine from the same manufacturer administered either 21 or 28 days apart. This double dose allows your body to develop a stronger immune response to counter a future infection. Your body also needs the extra exposure time to learn how to most effectively fight off exposure to the virus.

Yes, you will need to take both doses of the vaccine from the same manufacturer administered either 21 or 28 days apart. This double dose allows your body to develop a stronger immune response to counter a future infection. Your body also needs the extra exposure time to learn how to most effectively fight off exposure to the virus.

Yes, you will need to take both doses of the vaccine from the same manufacturer administered either 21 or 28 days apart. This double dose allows your body to develop a stronger immune response to counter a future infection. Your body also needs the extra exposure time to learn how to most effectively fight off exposure to the virus.

Yes, you will need to take both doses of the vaccine from the same manufacturer administered either 21 or 28 days apart. This double dose allows your body to develop a stronger immune response to counter a future infection. Your body also needs the extra exposure time to learn how to most effectively fight off exposure to the virus.

Yes, you will need to take both doses of the vaccine from the same manufacturer administered either 21 or 28 days apart. This double dose allows your body to develop a stronger immune response to counter a future infection. Your body also needs the extra exposure time to learn how to most effectively fight off exposure to the virus.

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4492 W. Lawrence Ave.

Chicago IL, 60630

Tel: 773.283.4950  Fax: 773.283.4850

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